Narciso Ibáñez Serrador – Rest in Peace

narcisoibanezserradorOn June 7th, the horror genre lost someone very important to the it, although most fans here in the states probably know very little of him. Narciso Ibáñez Serrador might not be a name most fans are familiar with, mainly because he didn’t produce a lot of work in the film genre, but what he did before that laid the grounds for the genre in Spain. According to author Antonio Lázaro-Reboll in his book Spanish Horror Film, “Narciso Ibáñez Serrador was the most culturally prominent image of horror in Spain in the late 1960s due to his horror-suspense TV series Historias para no dormir (Stories to Keep You Awake, 1966-67).” 

He grew up in the theater where both his parents were involved in, where his father Ibáñez Menta adapted horror classics for the stage. His parents divorced when he only 12, he would eventually work with his father in the late ’50s creating a TV show for Argentina’s only TV channel, adapting the works of Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson, with his father acting in them while he wrote the episodes. This was called Obras maestras del terror (Masterworks of Horror).  When he eventually came to Spain, he continued the work for television, cementing his reputation with the genre, even before making his first film. Continue reading

Naschy Werewolf Bust!

Naschy bustYears ago, I used to be into resin and vinyl model kits. I wasn’t the greatest painter, but I enjoyed it and I did okay. But I got out of it quite some time ago because it just was taking too much of my time. I would get a kit and then spend every waking minute on it until it was finished. Several years ago, when we were setting up at Wonderfest in Louisville, it was very hard not to give into the temptation and buy more kits. But I stood my ground and kept myself from getting any. I still have a lot of my kits that I did paint around the Krypt, but haven’t bought a new kit in years.

Until now.

My buddy (and key enabler) Phil, sent me the below pics of a new kit that just came out, knowing that it was going to be very hard for me to pass up. And moments later, I was chatting with the man responsible for putting this kit out, Paul Gill, and ordering one of the kits.

This El Retorno Del Hombre Lobo kit was sculpted and painted by Mark Van Tine. It is 9 1/2″ inches of all Naschy! Obviously if you order one, it does not come assembled or painted. The parts are the bust, hand, base, and black plastic chains. Just making sure that is clear.

The price is $100 plus s&h. Keep in mind, these are made in limited quantities, so if you have any interests, I would contact Paul Gill through Facebook right away to make sure there are some left.

Soundtrack Review: Killing of the Dolls / Necrophagus

 

Killing of the Dolls / Necrophagus
Released by Quartet Records, 2017

24 Tracks with a Total Running Time of 53 min. Music Composed and Conducted by Alfonso Santisteban

First and foremost, major kudos to Quartet Records for releasing this double soundtrack on CD. I remember seeing Necrophagus, under the title Graveyard of Horror years ago on VHS, and I never would have even thought that someday I would be able to have the soundtrack of this rare title on CD! And now here it is on a double feature soundtrack with Killing of the Dolls, another score by Alfonso Santisteban. Wonders never cease. But let’s get to the scores.

Continue reading

Movie Review: The Loreley’s Grasp

loreleysbanner

The Loreley’s Grasp (1974)
Directed by Amando de Ossorio
Starring Tony Kendall, Helga Liné, Silvia Tortosa, Josefina Jartin, Loreta Tovar, José Thelman, Luis Induni, Ángel Menéndez, Luis Barboo

loreley's grasp bagBack in the early 80’s, I went to a midnight screening of some horror movie called When the Screaming Stopped. I had never even heard of it before, but they were passing out barf bags, so how could this not be an awesome movie! Years later, I would discover that this was the re-titling of a Spanish horror movie from Amando de Ossorio, the very man who gave us the Blind Dead series. But the feature at hand was actually Las garras de Lorelei, or The Loreley’s Grasp. Looking back, this was might have been my first introduction to Spanish horror, and probably the first time my eyes laid upon the beauty was is Helga Liné. But more on that later. Since they were passing out barf bags, the movie had to be gory, right? And at that time in my life, gore was what I was looking for. The film did deliver, on many levels. It would be years later before I truly appreciated it for what it is. And that, is one hell of a fun time.

Continue reading

Year of Naschy

Naschy CollectionWhen the news broke today of the Paul Naschy Collection coming from Shout Factory, I was notified by more than a few friends on social media about it. I’m guessing my fondness of Senor Naschy and his work has gotten around! With all the titles that have been released, or have been announced, or ones that I’ve heard rumors are still coming, I am just in awe that this man’s work is finally getting the treatment and recognition he’s been deserving for way too long. It’s one thing for a company like Shout Factory to release a Vincent Price collection, since we all know that Price is a horror icon (and rightly so). So to see them give the same kind of treatment and spotlight on Paul Naschy…well, it is just an amazing thing. Even after his death, I know there are plenty of us out there still waving the flag to bring attention to him and his work, and with all these Blu-ray releases does nothing but help that cause. 2017 really will be the Year of Naschy!

Continue reading

Horror History: José Antonio Pérez Giner

perez_ginerJosé Antonio Pérez Giner
Born 1934

One person that is really needed to make movies happen is the producer. They are the ones that get the money to be able to make the money. Even on the lowest of budgets, someone needs to make sure things are happening, from having a crew, getting them paid, if they are even getting paid, or at least fed while their working. But it is also finding the right people for the job. So while they might not have their hands directly in the creative aspect of the filmmaking process, it is still a very important job.

In the Spanish film industry, José Antonio Pérez Giner was one man who help bring a lot of my favorite Spanish horrors to the screen. He started as a production manager, working on films like Sergio Leone’s The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966), as well as a couple of Paul Naschy’s films, such as The Werewolf vs the Vampire Women (1971). But he moved into the producer role, getting films made like Naschy’s Horror Rises from the Tomb (1973) and Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll (1974), as well as Amando de Ossorio’s Tombs of the Blind Dead (1972) and Loreley’s Grasp (1974), as many, many other great films. Also love knowing that there are some producers out there that understand the importance of the horror genre, even if they know it is a profitable one, they still want to create something magical. And I think he did just that.

In 2003, he was awarded the Career Award at the Sant Jordi Awards. In 2008 at Sitges, he was presented the Time-Machine Honorary Award.