Discover the Horror Podcast: Episode 25 – Freaky Frankensteins

Lady Frankenstein (1971), Erotic Rites of Frankenstsein (1973), Flesh for Frankenstein (1973).

While Frankenstein is one of the oldest monsters in the genre and has been adapted multiple times by a variety of creators, some closer to the original source than others, there are other filmmakers that go far enough away from the original novel that they’re not even in same library! But it is always interesting to see where these creative filmmakers take that story, giving it their own twist, and putting it out there for the world to see!

Join us as we delve into 3 different variations on the Frankenstein theme, all that deal with sex, nudity, gore, and some of the strangest in Euro-Horror!

Titles mentioned in this episode:

Continue reading

Movie Review: The Vengeance of Lady Morgan

VoLM banner

The Vengeance of Lady Morgan (1965)
Director Massimo Pupillo
Starring Barbara Nelli, Michel Forain, Gordon Mitchell, Paul Muller, Erika Blanc

There is something special about discovering a film that you had never heard of, especially when it came out over 50 years ago! Even better when it is an Italian gothic ghost story! At first, The Vengeance of Lady Morgan seems like your typical story about a ghost coming back from the dead for revenge, but it is quite different than what you’d expect from this genre, which for me, made it even more special. Continue reading

Movie Review: Nightmare Castle

nightmarecastlebanner

(1965)
Directed by Mario Caiano
Starring Barbara Steele, Paul Muller, Helga Liné, Laurence Clift,
Giuseppe Addobbati, Rik Battaglia

In 1960, Barbara Steele starred in Mario Bava’s Black Sunday, which set her on her path of being a horror icon. Over the next few years, she starred in many gothic horror films in Italy. When she appeared in Mario Caiano’s first entry into this sub-genre, it wasn’t her first rodeo. Before that point, Caiano’s work mainly consisted in the westerns and peplum (sword & sandal) genre. It is pretty surprising that he and co-writer Fabio De Agostini came up with such a great story, with plenty of strange angles, and filled the picture with so much atmosphere that I’m surprised that the fog doesn’t just ooze out of your television when you’re watching it. The original title is Amanti d’oltretomba, but it has been released under the titles The Faceless Monster and Night of the Doomed. But now, thanks to Severin, you can get the uncut and original version under Nightmare Castle.
Continue reading