Little Shoppe of Horrors Salutes The Gorgon

The latest issue of the long running (and best magazine devoted to all things Hammer) is now out and available to order. This issue tackles Hammer’s 1964 film The Gorgon, starring Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and Barbara Shelley, with the article Reflections of Fear: The Making of The Gorgon by Joshua Kennedy.

Within the pages, you’ll also find the article Cut Me a Robe from Toe to Lobe … Give Me a Skin for Dancing In: The Making of The Witches by Bruce G. Hallenbeck, as well as an article on the star of that film, Joan Fontaine. There is also an article on Don Houghton, the screenwriter of the modern day Dracula films Hammer made in the early to mid ’70s, by David Gee.

Like with any issue of Little Shoppe of Horrors, every page is a delight and filled with great stuff. Head over to their website HERE to order your copy now. And if you want to know more about Hammer, just pick up some of their back issues that are readily available.

New Little Shoppe of Horrors Coming Soon!

Coming in November, issue #45 of Little Shoppe of Horrors will be unleashed to the world! This time, their cover story is all about the making of The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), Hammer’s sequel to the film that helped put them in the big league, written by Bruce G. Hallenbeck. Hallenbeck’s work is always so informative and entertaining so I can’t wait to dig into it!

There will also be coverage on the making of Amicus’ The Creeping Flesh (1973) in an article by John Hamilton entitled The Creature Walks On the Earth, as well as David Gee’s Dracula and the Modern Age, which is about Don Houghton, who wrote the screenplays for some of the later Dracula films that took place in a modern setting, such as Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) and The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973).

Then there is more of the usual great stuff in there, such as more Hammer Diaries of Christopher Wicking, more History of Horror Film Fanzines, book reviews, and so much more, with a stunning front cover by William Stout.

You can order your copy by visiting their official site HERE. They don’t have it up on their site just yet, but keep checking back. And if you don’t have all of the back issues, then why not order a couple of those as well! These are essential reading for your Hammer (and other British horror films) history lessons!

Little Shoppe of Horrors #44

LSoH44The latest issue of THE best Hammer magazine out there, Little Shoppe of Horrors, is taking orders for issue # 44, which is covering The Hound of the Baskervilles, as well as The Stranglers of Bombay and The Terror of the Tongs.

As with all issues of LSoH, there is plenty of great material here,  written by some of the best Hammer scholars, such as Denis Meikle and Bruce G. Hallenbeck.

David J. Miller has an article on Hammer’s DP Jack Asher, called He Painted with Light, as well as coverage on the new Dracula BBC series.

With another stunning cover by Mark Maddox, as well as other amazing art and illustrations inside, it doesn’t take long to realize why this magazine has been going for close to 50 years. Every issues is always a real treat.

You can order your copy now by going to their site HERE. Especially during these strange times, the creators of magazines like this need your support! 

Book News! Start Saving!

For those book lovers in your life, here are more than a few gift ideas for the upcoming holidays, or just because you want to support the print industry! I know each and every one of these titles will be added to my own personal library in the very near future! But these are a few that we’ve recently come across that sound pretty amazing.

Darkening the Italian Screen: Interviews with Genre and Exploitation Directors Who Debuted in the 1950s and 1960s by Eugenio Ercolani is a collection of interviews with names that might not be as familiar with most fans, but yet have had a huge impact on the Italian exploitation cinema. There are some of the usual suspects like actor George Hilton and director Sergio Martino, but then we’ll also get to hear from the likes of Uberto Lenzi, Alberto De Martino, Enzo G. Castellari, Franco Rossetti, among others. I can’t wait to hear some of their stories and tales from the trenches of getting some of their films made and released. Continue reading