Peter Wyngarde & Bradford Dillman – Rest in Peace

Peter Wyngarde - RIP

It was only a matter of time since the new year started that we would lose some familiar faces from the movies and TV shows that we love. I almost hate reporting on stuff like this, but I still think it is important to remember these great talents and for the hours of entertainment that gave us, that continues to live on with each viewing.

Peter Wyngarde had a very interesting life, appearing as a fashionable spy in Department S, then in a spin-off series called Jason King. It was this character that helped inspire Mike Myers’ Austin Powers. He appeared in many stage plays, TV appearances and even his share of movies. But due to some run ins with the law, including an arrest and conviction of a “act of gross indecency” in 1975, that didn’t help much with his career.

But for horror fans, he might have only appeared in two films in the genre, but they are incredible. In Jack Clayton’s The Innocents (1961), he didn’t even have a speaking role as the ghostly Peter Quint, but made quite an impact. Then the following year, he had the lead role in Burn, Witch, Burn (1962), as a college professor whos wife just happens to be a witch! Originally called Night of the Eagle in England, this based on a story by Fritz Leiber, Jr. and really is a must see.

Wyngarde passed away on January 15th, at the reported age of 90 years old.

Bradford Dillman - RIP

Bradford Dillman was a very familiar face to someone growing up watching TV in the ’60s & ’70s. In fact, my first memory of him, even though I was too young to remember, was in an episode of Night Gallery, based on a H.P. Lovecraft story, Pickman’s Model. I always remember thinking how cool it would be to have that painting! Dillman would also appear in quite a few other genre TV shows, like The Eyes of Charles Sand (1972), Moon of the Wolf (1972), Demon, Demon (1975), and Dark Secret of Harvest Home (1978).

But he also made his mark on quite a few feature films like The Mephisto Waltz (1971), Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971), Chosen Survivors (1974), Bug (1975), The Swarm (1978), Piranha (1978). It was his starring roles in Bug and Piranha when I started to remember his face and name, discovering all the other great things that he appeared in over the years.

Dillman passed away on January 16th, due to complications from pneumonia.

Our thoughts go out to these talented actors and their friends and family. They will be missed, but never forgotten.

2017 Year in Review Part 2: In Remembrance

As horror fans, we lost some huge icons this last year. Some were older and some went way too soon. But because of their work in cinema, they will never entirely be gone from us. We can always pop in a DVD or Blu-ray and they will be just as alive as we remembered, giving us even more entertainment than before.

Being a fan of cinema for any length of time, you would think one could get used to losing some of their movie heroes and idols, but it still hurts when you ponder “what if they were to make just one more film?” Being a fan of cinema also helps keep their memory of what they did make alive and well. And by continuing to sing their praises, we can introduce them to the next generation of cinema lovers, so they can experience the same joy that we did, and still do, each and every time we bust out one of their movies.

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Suzanna Leigh – Rest in Peace

Suzanna Leigh - RIPHammer fans have lost another name from the studio we love so much. Suzanna Leigh, who appeared in The Lost Continent (1968) and Lust for a Vampire (1971), passed away yesterday at the age of 72.

The Lost Continent is a favorite of mine since it is just so damn crazy, but so much fun. We had the wonderful opportunity to meet her at a couple of conventions over the years and she was always such a sweet person to talk to. She had plenty of great stories to tell as well. Other genre titles she appeared in are The Deadly Bees (1966) and the cult film Son of Dracula (1974) with Ringo Starr and Harry Nilsson. But probably even scarier than any of those films was probably working with Klaus Kinski in the 1965 film The Pleasure Girls.

Oh yeah…and she worked with some guy named Elvis.

That is one of the real shames of being a fan of a studio that (realistically) stopped making films almost 30 years ago, that the stars that we loved to watch and follow are sadly slowly leaving us. But as I always say, we will always have their movies to remind us of their talent, and their work will continue to give audiences both old and new, entertainment for years to come.  Gone, but never forgotten.

Our thoughts go out to her friends and family during this difficult time.

Umberto Lenzi – Rest in Peace

Umberto Lenzi - RIPIf you were a fan of Giallo films, or just Italian horror cinema, especially their cannibal sub-genre, then you definitely knew who Umberto Lenzi was. While he started off studying law, he turned to his real passion…cinema. At first working as a critic and writer, he soon moved into film production. His first film was Queen of the Seas (1958). But starting in the late ’60s, he made several well made giallos, such as So Sweet…So Perverse (1969), Seven Blood-Stained Orchids (1972), Spasmo (1974), and Eyeball (1975).

But in 1972, he made the film Sacrifice (aka Man from Deep River), which was a slight take off on the 1970 film A Man Called Horse, except Lenzi’s was a little darker. With this film, some say that he started the Italian cannibal sub-genre, even before Deodato’s Cannibal Holocaust (1980). In fact, a year after that film came out, Lenzi did his best to top even that one, with Cannibal Ferox (aka Make Them Die Slowly) which one might think would be hard to do. Whether he did or not is up to the viewers, but either way, it’s a pretty tough film to watch. He would continue to make films into the ’90s, but never with any real success, usually due to budgetary reasons.

While he is usually remembered because of the later day films he made, his early giallo titles are well worth seeking out. None the less, no matter your tastes in his films, he was one filmmaker that made a permanent impact on the horror genre. And that is something to be said.

Lenzi recently passed away on Oct. 19th, at the age of 86. He will be missed, but his films will help him and his memory live on.

Suzan Farmer – Rest in Peace

Susan Farmer - RIPThis is a name that might not be too familiar, but if you’re a Hammer fan, then you’ll know the face. Farmer appeared in several titles from Hammer, including two of their swashbuckling  movies, The Crimson Blade (1963) and The Devil-Ship Pirates (1964). But it was mainly for her role in Dracula, Prince of Darkness when horror fans took note. She followed that film up immediately with Rasputin: The Mad Monk, once again coming up against the sizeable Christopher Lee. Another non-Hammer picture that she made that I remember fondly is Die, Monster, Die! (1965), starring alongside Boris Karloff. This was one that I saw in my youth and really made an impact with me. While she might not have been as glamorous or as known as some of the other Hammer starlets, her performances always stood out and are very memorable.

She passed away on Sept. 17th. Our thoughts go out to her friends and family. Thankfully, like all of our movie heroes and heroines, they will live on for fans of their films, especially for Hammer fans!

Basil Gogos – Rest in Peace

Basil-Gogos-Artwork

If you grew up with Famous Monsters of Filmland, or even collected them later on in life, then you are more than aware of the work of Basil Gogos. His stunning portraits of such monstrous and darkened characters but done with such amazing colors, always made an impact with the fans. And that still rings true today just as much as it did when those magazines first hit the newsstands. In fact, probably even more so.

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Tobe Hooper – Rest in Peace

Tobe Hooper RIPThere are certain names in the horror genre that are known as icons, or one of the Masters of Horrors. And yesterday, the genre and the fans lost another one of them, Tobe Hooper. Regardless of the ups and downs of his filmography, he will always be remembered for directing the infamous 1974 film The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which still is as gritty, scary, and damn entertaining as it was when it first assaulted movie audiences over forty years ago. His adaptation of Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot (1979) still remains as one of the best made-for-TV movies of that decade, not to mention other entertaining titles in his filmography, such as The Funhouse (1981), Lifeforce (1985), and of course, the bat-shit-crazy sequel Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986).

Hooper passed away yesterday at the age of 74. For as long as there are horror movie fans, there will be screenings of TCM. And with each of those viewings, there will be some watching it for the first time that will be amazed and entranced at what they see on screen, possibly even inspiring them to try and do what Hooper and company did all those years ago in the dead heat of a Texas summer all those years ago.

You definitely will never be forgotten, Mr. Hooper. Thank you for the scares. Our thoughts go out to his friends and family during this difficult time.